New Year, Same Economic Problems [Infographic]

What’s ahead for our economy in 2016?

The Straits Times produced a great infographic showing how the global economy played out in 2015.globe world currency economy money travel

As always there were many things that weren’t anticipated 12 months ago and we’re likely to say the same in 12 months time.

A slowing China and general oversupply has led to slumping commodity prices.

Oil has been hammered down to its lowest price since 2003.

Copper is trading at $2/lb, which is comparable to its price during the Financial Crisis.

These low input prices, in theory, are great for consumers and manufacturers. In reality, however, they usually mean that economic growth is going to slow down.

Check out this infogrphic to remind yourself of the year just gone


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Michael is a director of Metropole Property Strategists who create wealth for their clients through independent, unbiased property advice and advocacy. He's been voted Australia's leading property investment adviser and his opinions are regularly featured in the media. Visit

'New Year, Same Economic Problems [Infographic]' have 2 comments

  1. January 11, 2016 @ 7:11 am peter vella

    Hi Micheal, looking at the above diagram/time chain most all presented facts appear negative/or at least negative yet housing boom ect??? I dont whant to be negative but all data if looked at close with open mind sound weak for future growth?? yet Sydney housing market UP?? LETS SEE WHAT A NORM 6.75% RISE WILL DO………..THATS THE TIME TO SHOP I FOUND IN MY NEAR 40YRS OF PROPERTY/INVESTING…CHEERS


  2. January 11, 2016 @ 12:28 pm Ben Loveday

    The infographic, apart from being blurry and hard to read, is remarkable by virtue of the omissions. Such as the Paris Climate Summit and that there is now more investment in renewable energy infrastructure than in non renewables. It also does not mention the migration of 2 million refugees into the Eurozone, and the endemic (and seemingly unresolvable) middle eastern warfare on many fronts, the continuing largest migration in human history from western China to the eastern cities, and the beginnings of mass migration due to rising water levels in Bangladesh delta. In this sense the infographic shows the big current/past effects of economic transitions, but fails to identify the forces that will shape the future economy of the World.


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