Now you can see the $94 Trillion World Economy in One Chart [Infographic]

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Just four countries—the U.S., China, Japan, and Germany—make up over half of the world’s economic output by gross domestic product (GDP) in nominal terms.

In fact, the GDP of the U.S. alone is greater than the combined GDP of 170 countries.

How do the different economies of the world compare?

In this visualization Visual Capitalist look at GDP by country in 2021, using data and estimates from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Global Gdp By Country 2021 V12 Mobile

Source: Visual Capitalist

An Overview of GDP

GDP serves as a broad indicator of a country’s economic output.

It measures the total market value of final goods and services produced in a country in a specific timeframe, such as a quarter or year.

In addition, GDP also takes into consideration the output of services provided by the government, such as money spent on defense, healthcare, or education.

Generally speaking, when GDP is increasing in a country, it is a sign of greater economic activity that benefits workers and businesses (while the reverse is true for a decline).

The World Economy: Top 50 Countries

Who are the biggest contributors to the global economy?

Here is the ranking of the 20 largest countries by GDP in 2021:

China’s economy is second in nominal terms, hovering at near $17 trillion in GDP.

It remains the largest manufacturer worldwide based on output with an extensive production of steel, electronics, and robotics, among others.

The largest economy in Europe is Germany, which exports roughly 20% of the world’s motor vehicles.

In 2019, overall trade equaled nearly 90% of the country’s GDP.

The World Economy: 10 Smallest Countries

On the other end of the spectrum are the world’s smallest economies by GDP, primarily developing and island nations.

With a GDP of $70 million, Tuvalu is the smallest economy in the world.

Situated between Hawaii and Australia, the largest industry of this volcanic archipelago relies on territorial fishing rights.

In addition, the country earns significant revenue from its “.tv” web domain.

Between 2011 and 2019, it earned $5 million annually from companies—including Amazon-owned Twitch to license the Twitch.tv domain name—equivalent to roughly 7% of the country’s GDP.

Like Tuvalu, many of the world’s smallest economies are in Oceania, including Nauru, Palau, and Kiribati. Additionally, several countries above rely on the tourism industry for over one-third of their employment.

The Fastest Growing Economies in the World in 2021

With 123% projected GDP growth, Libya’s economy is estimated to have the sharpest rise.

Oil is propelling its growth, with 1.2 million barrels being pumped in the country daily.

Along with this, exports and a depressed currency are among the primary factors behind its recovery.

Rank Country Region
2021 Real GDP Growth (Annual % Change)
1 🇱🇾 Libya Africa 123.2%
2 🇬🇾 Guyana South America 20.4%
3 🇲🇴 Macao Asia 20.4%
4 🇲🇻 Maldives Asia 18.9%
5 🇮🇪 Ireland Europe 13.0%
6 🇦🇼 Aruba Caribbean 12.8%
7 🇵🇦 Panama Central America 12.0%
8 🇨🇱 Chile South America 11.0%
9 🇵🇪 Peru South America 10.0%
10 🇩🇴 Dominican Republic Caribbean 9.5%

Ireland’s economy, with a projected 13% real GDP growth, is being supported by the largest multinational corporations in the world.

Facebook, TikTok, Google, Apple, and Pfizer all have their European headquarters in the country, which has a 12.5% corporate tax rate—or about half the global average.

But these rates are set to change soon, as Ireland joined the OECD 15% minimum corporate tax rate agreement which was finalized in October 2021.

Macao’s economy bounced back after COVID-19 restrictions began to lift, but more storm clouds are on the horizon for the Chinese district.

The CCP’s anti-corruption campaign and recent arrests could signal a more strained relationship between Mainland China and the world’s largest gambling hub.

Looking Ahead at the World’s GDP

The global GDP figure of $94 trillion may seem massive to us today, but such a total might seem much more modest in the future.

In 1970, the world economy was only about $3 trillion in GDP—or 30 times smaller than it is today.

Over the next thirty years, the global economy is expected to more or less double again. By 2050, global GDP could total close to $180 trillion.

ALSO READ: 10 Global risks that could derail the world economic recovery

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Michael is a director of Metropole Property Strategists who help their clients grow, protect and pass on their wealth through independent, unbiased property advice and advocacy. He's once again been voted Australia's leading property investment adviser and one of Australia's 50 most influential Thought Leaders. His opinions are regularly featured in the media. Visit Metropole.com.au


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