5 things you must do if you want to remain healthy

I’ve heard it said that your true wealth is what you’re left with after you take away all your money.

You’re probably reading this blog because you’re interested in property investment, but if you’ve been following me for a while you’ll know that I believe there is much more to wealth than money or property.

Clearly good health is critical to your wealth and with so many of us making health related New Years’ resolutions I found this article in The Age about 5 Habits of Healthy People interesting reading.

Performance Coach Andrew May wrote:

After spending nearly 20 years working with a range of people to improve their health and fitness, I’m constantly asked ‘what is the secret to staying fit and healthy?’

While it’s easy to go for the latest pill, potion, bottle or lotion promising you can ‘get fit’, ‘lose weight’, ‘maximize energy’, ‘improve your wellbeing’, ‘stay young’, ‘improve your sex life’ – there really is no magic, there are no secrets, and there is no fountain of youth.

Sorry that’s probably not what you wanted to read.

But I have noticed a number of lifestyle habits that fit and healthy people do, day in and day out.

1. Eat breakfast

Breakfast is, without doubt, the most important meal of the day.eat healthy fruit

And I’m not talking about sculling a cup of coffee and vacuuming up a jam donut.

A healthy breakfast fuels your body and brain to perform throughout the day.

And if you think you’re too busy to eat breakfast, think again.

Not having brekky slows down your thinking and energy levels.

It only takes five to 10 minutes to eat a bowl of porridge with fresh fruit, or to prepare some wholemeal toast and a poached egg.

2. Exercise regularly

If the Prime Minister can find time to exercise most days, why can’t you?

Let’s face it, everybody these days is super busy – between work, and life, and relationships, and kids, and social media, and … there are more and more things competing for our time.

Exercising three times a week for 60 minutes is less than 2 per cent of the total time you have available each week.

How much time do you spend watching TV? Sending emails? Or sitting in traffic?

Getting a blend of cardiovascular training (for the heart and lungs), strength training (for the muscles and bones) and flexibility (for the tendons and joints) will keep your body young, minimise the risk of many lifestyle diseases, boost your self-esteem and pump your body full of energy.

Try to find an activity you enjoy and train with family members, colleagues or friends to add accountability.

3. Keep moving

While it is important to lock in at least three or four fitness sessions a week, it is also vital to keep your body moving; this is called incidental movement.

The average worker sits down the majority of their day – catching the bus or driving to work, sitting at your desk or in meetings, travelling back home and then sitting down for dinner and crashing in front of the TV.

Sound familiar? Research shows people who move regularly (meaning get up off your backside and consciously move around every 90 minutes) burn up to 350 extra calories a day, the equivalent of a steady 60-minute walk.

Take the stairs whenever possible, wash your own car rather than going to a car wash, mow your own lawn. Move.

4. Show gratitude

A healthy mind focuses more on what you have and less on what you don’t have.

When you become stressed and life throws challenges at you, showing gratitude for what you have is a proven way to stay in control and manage your emotions.

Sounds simple, but how do you put this into practice?

At the end of every week make a list of five to seven things in your life you are grateful for.

An example might be a loving family, quality friends, a rewarding job that gives you money to travel, a healthy body, a great place to live, or children that just adore you.

5. Have fun

It is way too easy to get caught up on the treadmill of life and wake up, go to work, go home, go to bed, wake up, go to work … making time for fun is a habit that you not only need to do, but can also help you live longer.

freedom motivation weekend relax life happy psychology travelA team of psychologists from Yale University discovered positive thinkers live 7.5 years longer than pessimists.

Constant worrying puts a burden on the heart and dramatically increases the negative effects of stress.

When you have fun and engage in activities you really enjoy, the body releases endorphins that send a message of confidence and satisfaction to the brain.

Watch your favourite comedy show, hang out with silly friends, play.

Sounds simple, doesn’t it? You know this stuff, and yet, if you think about the last week, how many of these five healthy habits did you actually use?

With a little bit of discipline and focus, you too can be one of ‘those people’ who appears to have endless energy and breezes through the day. Go for it!

Want more of this type of information?


Michael is a director of Metropole Property Strategists who create wealth for their clients through independent, unbiased property advice and advocacy. He's been voted Australia's leading property investment adviser and his opinions are regularly featured in the media. Visit Metropole.com.au

'5 things you must do if you want to remain healthy' have 3 comments

  1. January 4, 2014 @ 11:04 am Lee

    Michael I love your property commentary, thanks.
    Also, good beginning to this article, however the article written by the ‘performance coach’ begins with Point number 1 being misleading so for the first time ever, I thought I’d comment as this is my area of expertise.
    You shouldn’t eat breakfast out of habit. Skipping breakfast is actually proven that you will eat less and not more. When you’re hungry, eat. Make sure that your hunger signals work properly though, by eating more fats in your diet and less (if at all) sugar and wheat.
    Eating whole grains is another packet of nonsense. They are usually pulverized into a highly refined version of their former self and are just as rapidly digesting as white flour products in most instances (take wholemeal bread as per his example, with the same GI as white bread) so there’s no logic in that one either. Insulin floods your body the same as if you ate the white bread and then you are not only fatigued soon after but INSULIN is the primary regulator of fat metabolism too. So, anything Which leaves insulin levels low is a great thing. That means no refined (or processed) carbohydrates…
    Sure, your performance for half an hour may be good (not great) but you’ll be in the glucose-insulin-tired-glucose roller coaster all day.

    So, I love your property commentary and thanks a bunch. As my thank you, I’ll give you some clinically (and through my fitness/food coaching business) proven advice on nutrition.
    Eat protein, fats and vegetables. Some dairy (full fat), some nuts and seeds, some fruit and only when you’re hungry.
    Cut out the sugar and wheat and your life will change massively 😉
    Easy as that!

    Here’s 2 great blog posts from much respected Drs or Bloggers on the above, with scientific studies and proof, not just pseudoscience or here say from a coaching book.


    Thanks again for your posts though. Sincerely. Just couldn’t let this misinfo go uncommented on.

    P.s the rest of his article is actually good from a performance point of view. Just don’t want people to think that eating grains and toast (which is what got our world into the mess in the first place) is going to help them at all into the future.

    Accredited Food and Wellness Coach


  2. March 4, 2014 @ 11:17 pm Art of Living

    Wonderful tips , specially eat breakfast . I guess meditation is the great way to keep the healthy mind.


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