What will Sydney look like in 2050?

The Sydney Morning Herald  recently took a peak into the future as to how Sydney could look in 2050.

The city’s population is forecast to reach 7.5 million by mid-century, 3.2 million more than now. It was suggested that…

We’ll live closer to each other, we’ll connect in digital spaces as much as in person, and we’ll stick closer to home. Instead of battling the traffic we’ll enjoy seamless journeys on multiple linked modes of transport.

We’ll harbour-hop from village to village on vessels big and small. The most spectacular central business district in the Asia-Pacific region will be home to less of the city’s big-business activity but more of its residents.

Sydney will be a more Asian-looking city, in the faces of its people and the bustling diversity of its streets where people live, shop and work.

The forces that have held sway over Sydney’s development this past century – car ownership, the aspiration for a quarter-acre block, space-greedy manufacturing on the perimeter – are losing their grip.

New forces – smaller families, a low-carbon economy, digital connectivity, an ageing population, knowledge-based work, globalism – are shaping the city of the future.

Mid-century, Sydney could be the exchange powerhouse for ideas and business in south-east Asia, eclipsing rivals such as Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and Tokyo, says the dean of the faculty of built environment at the University of NSW, Alec Tzannes.

Where will all these new people live?

“There is no question that density and agglomeration are the basis of economic productivity,” says the chief executive of the Committee for Sydney, Tim Williams. With higher-density living in the inner and many outer suburbs already, it’s the “middle ring” – around areas such as Strathfield, Hurstville and Ryde – where “much of the new housing action of the next few decades” will occur, Williams predicts.

And how will we live?[sam id=34 codes=’true’]

We’ll live closer to each other, we’ll connect in digital spaces as much as in person, and we’ll stick closer to home. Instead of battling the traffic we’ll enjoy seamless journeys on multiple linked modes of transport.

We’ll harbour-hop from village to village on vessels big and small. The most spectacular central business district in the Asia-Pacific region will be home to less of the city’s big-business activity but more of its residents.

Suburbs will be places to work instead of places just to get to work from, and those who don’t work from home will be within 20 minutes by train, bus, cycle or walk from their office. For most people, the nine-to-five routine will seem alien and so will the cross-city commute. Work times will be “very individual” as we connect with colleagues in other time zones around the world.

A mix of densities and housing types with a range of affordability will support diverse populations, so, for example, health and aged-care workers, teachers and tradespeople can live closer to those who buy their services.

Sydney will grow from strength to strength…

Mid-century, Sydney could be the exchange powerhouse for ideas and business in south-east Asia, eclipsing rivals such as Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and Tokyo, says the dean of the faculty of built environment at the University of NSW, Alec Tzannes.

Adding to the gifts of a “wonderful environment” and clement climate, “we will have established our world-class leadership in finance and education and core values, as reflected in our laws and our equitable society”, he says.

“It makes us very distinctive in this region, a powerful player.”

It will be “a place where global leaders want to be”, Tzannes says.

And we’ll decentralise…

Around the city centres will be constellations of town centres and villages with cafes, bars, offices and meeting spaces. Banks, government departments and other companies might have, say, 20 regional offices, so “instead of everyone coming in to the CBD . . . individuals and employees can go and work out of them”, a futurist, Ross Dawson, says.

 

Of course it may not work out that way…

There’s a different and more likely scenario for Sydney based on current trends: a sprawling, congested, polarised Los Angeles-style metropolis with ethnic enclaves, wealth and class divisions, clogged motorways, incoherent landscapes, no obvious focal points and expanses of cheap housing devoid of amenity or design integrity.

To read more of this fascinating look into the Sydney of the future read the full article at the Sydney Morning Herald.

[post_ender]



Want more of this type of information?


About

Michael is a director of Metropole Property Strategists who create wealth for their clients through independent, unbiased property advice and advocacy. He's been once agin been voted Australia's leading property investment adviser and his opinions are regularly featured in the media. Visit Metropole.com.au


'What will Sydney look like in 2050?' have no comments

Be the first to comment this post!

Would you like to share your thoughts?

Your email address will not be published.
CAPTCHA Image

*

0
0

Michael's Daily Insights

Join Michael Yardney's inner circle of daily subscribers.

NOTE: this daily service is a different subscription to our weekly newsletter so...

REGISTER NOW

Subscribe!