Weekend reads – Must see articles from the last week

There are more interesting articles, commentaries and analyst reports on the Web every week than anyone could read in a month.

Each Saturday morning I like to share some of the ones I’ve read during the week.

Monday will be here before you know it, so enjoy some weekend reading…and please forward to your friends by clicking the social link buttons.


Foreign money set to continue to flood into Melbourne

Melbourne real estate agencies will have no shortage of funds thanks to foreign input according to an article in Your Property Investor magazine.

The wave of foreign money flowing into Melbourne’s property market is set to continue in 2016 according to one major real estate firm. money

According to Savills, the flow of offshore money to Melbourne has helped push the per square metre price of a number of real estate sectors in the city into record territory.

Savills claims land rates in the Melbourne CBD have pushed past $30,000 for the first time, while land in suburban Melbourne is on average worth a record $10,000 a square metre and land in the Southbank district is selling for up to $20,000 a square metre.

Savills Australia’s state director CBD & metropolitan sales, Clinton Baxter, said much of the demand for Melbourne real estate by foreign buyers had come from high profile international retail brands, student accommodation providers and buyers seeking properties with development and value-add options and that is likely to continue in 2016.

Find the full article here

Here are some charts worth thinking about…

These charts in a blog by James Altucher,   represent not hopeful thinking…but facts about the direction of where the world is going.




Click here for the full article


More myths go under the microscope + Investors pay for unused infrastructure

Another great Real Estate Talk show  produced by Kevin Turner.

In this show:

  • Michael Yardney challenges the idea that becoming a successful property investor is purely dependent on cash flow.
  • George Raptis reflects on years of experience that lead him to understand the biggest mistakes property investors make.
  • Jane Slack-Smith explain the downfalls of investing in the property you are living in.
  • Andrew Mirams discusses what makes a successful property investor.
  • Andrew Wilson looks at the current statistics, and gives a different viewpoint in which to analyse them.
  • Jan Somers explains why using time to create strategy work out better in the long term.

If you don’t already subscribe to this excellent weekly Internet based radio show do so now by clicking here.


High LVR loans have been declining for years

Pete Wargent discusses this week’s media attention to the Australia loan to valuation ratio in his recent blog.

60 Minutes was an interesting talking point this week, wherein some American geezer claimed that he “could” have got a 95 per cent mortgage using a “fake income” by pretending to be a “gay couple”.OK.

Given that he didn’t actually get a mortgage written, it is a little perturbing how often people choose to believe what random punters say in preference to the actual data, but such is the nature of confirmation bias.

Household debt is high, no doubt, and some lending has been reckless, particularly in mining towns, but by the same token not everything that is claimed on the internet or elsewhere is true.

For example, some years ago bearish commentators got sucked in to believing erroneous figures which claimed that an incredibly high percentage of lending was 100 per cent mortgages.

Of course, the data sources quoted advertised loans rather than actual loans written, a rookie error that surely wouldn’t pass the sniff test.Another favourite trick is to tap a few notional numbers into a mortgage calculator and use this as “evidence” of irresponsible lending, conveniently neglecting to mention the key words “may be able to borrow”. Clickbait ahoy!
Read the full article here


What rises faster, house prices or a cup of coffee?

There is nothing most of us love more than a perfect cup of coffee, if fact we often go to great lengths to get it. But how much do you think the perfect coffee with worth? According to an article on realestate.com.au we are paying more for coffee than we think. coffee-5

Australians love to talk about rising property prices.  But how do house price changes compare to price variations for other everyday goods?

While we all love to say everything is going up and life is getting far pricier – is it actually true?

To celebrate our national day we’ve compared how much Australians spend on houses to other everyday items such as a cup of coffee and petrol.

Between 2005 and 2015, which rose faster? The price of your daily latte or houses?


We began our search by looking at the Australian Bureau of Statistics indexes for house prices and wages.

We compared those numbers against the relative price of petrol, the relative price of a cup of coffee, the relative price of a Big Mac, the relative price of a bottle of water and the relative price of hot chips a the MCG from 2005 to 2015.

Click here for the full article


Weekend Video: “What’s the secret to still dancing at 106?”


Blogs you may have missed this week:

Whilst back business for most – the housing rental market isn’t picking the pace

 What makes Warren Buffett a great investor – intelligence or discipline?

Here’s where the new jobs are being created 

Is negative gearing losing it lustre?

How to sleep yourself to success (as in actual sleep)


Want more of this type of information?


Michael is a director of Metropole Property Strategists who create wealth for their clients through independent, unbiased property advice and advocacy. He's been voted Australia's leading property investment adviser and his opinions are regularly featured in the media. Visit Metropole.com.au

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