Weekend reads – must see articles from the last week

There are more interesting articles, commentaries and analyst reports on the Web every week than anyone could read in a month.

Each Saturday morning I like to share some of the ones I’ve read during the week.

Monday will be here before you know it, so enjoy some weekend reading…and please forward to your friends by clicking the social link buttons.

Melbourne and Sydney no longer rank among the world’s top 10 most expensive cities

We may be paying $5 for our coffees and $50 for taxi fares, but as reported in the latest article on 9news.com.au, Sydney and Melbourne don’t hold up in the top spot of most expensive cities.

Sydney and Melbourne have been pushed from the world’s 10 most expensive cities due to the weaker Australian dollar.  melbourne flinders victoria

London, New York and Los Angeles have pushed Sydney, Melbourne and Oslo out of the Economist Intelligence Unit’s top 10 most expensive cities.

Singapore was ranked as the most expensive city for the third year running, closely followed by joint second place holders Zurich and Hong Kong.

Sydney and Melbourne have fallen from fifth and sixth place to 20th and 21st, respectively.

The twice yearly survey compares prices more than 160 products and services including, food, drinks, clothing, household supplies and personal care items, home rents, transport, utility bills, private schools, domestic help and recreational help.

Find the full article here

Property sellers beware + Chines buyers get a BIG bonus

Another great Real Estate Talk show  produced by Kevin Turner.

In this show:

  • Michael Yardney discusses how you can make sure you don’t lose out when it comes to interstate investment.
  • Rob Balanda from MBA Lawyers talks about what you can and can’t do with easements.
  • Tim Lawless  discuses how the Chinese are not the only overseas buyers eyeing off Australian property and why lot sizes are reducing.
  • Charles Pittar CEO for Juwai.com discusses the impact following  reports that buyers who are holding yuan in the first quarter of 2016 have the equivalent of more than $70,000 (AUD) in increased purchasing power when buying an average priced Australian home, compared to four years ago.
  • Mark Dwyer addresses a recent Facebook post regarding what could be very misleading advertising.
  • Naomi Findlay from Silk Home Staging and Styling talk us through what it takes to sell a property.
  • Marta Higuera one of the CEOs from Open Agent responds to recent concerns about the website, which purport to work with sellers to help them find the best agent.

If you don’t already subscribe to this excellent weekly Internet based radio show do so now by clicking here.

Plastic fantastic

Credit card balances proven to remain low according to the latest blog from Peter Wargent.

Data from the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) shows that credit card balances continue to decline.

The average balance was down by another 2.4 per cent to $3,114 in January.

In smoothed terms annual credit balances were 2.5 per cent lower than one year previously.


Read the full article here

‘Mum and dad’ investors facing settlement risk

After a year that seemed to soar in off the plan sales, it would seem some buyers are about the face a rude awakening.

New reports on Smart Property Investment claim that the high rise dream may be over.

A senior property industry identity has warned that “mums and dads” who paid deposits on multiple off-the-plan properties could be at risk if valuations fail to match prices. property plan apartment build develop construction_new

Century 21 Australia chairman Charles Tarbey has warned of the increasing number of new properties “coming out of the ground” at a time when prices are beginning to moderate.

“They do run a risk. We talked about this very heavily last year. In some areas it can be quite a substantial risk,” Mr Tarbey said.

“In great strong capital cities, the risk is probably reduced, but the reality is there are more and more homes coming onto the market in terms of e stablished homes as well as newer properties, and the demand for those properties is tapering off.”

“If that occurs then you start to get the more worrying concerns which are valuations meeting expectations of the contract price down the track.”

Click here for the full article

Study Tests if Smartphones May Be Making Us Depressed And Anxious

Our phones have become like that third arm we can’t live without – it had our diaries, phone number, reminder, keeps us up to date with what is going on with the world.

So it comes as no surprise that our reliable toy is also connected to our emotions – though maybe too much according to the latest PsyBlog.

“There’s a long history of the public fearing new technologies…” ~ Professor Alejandro Lleras

Being highly engaged with, or even ‘addicted’ to mobile phones is linked to elevated levels of anxiety and depression, new research finds.

However, simply using a phone as a way of alleviating boredom is not linked to depression or anxiety.

People seem to use their phones as a kind of security blanket in anxiety-provoking situations.

While this is not necessarily a problem, the study also found that using mobile phones as an emotional coping mechanism was linked to depression and anxiety.

For the study, over 300 people were surveyed and asked questions about their cellphone and internet usage, their mental health and so on.

Click here for the full article

Weekend Videos: The secret language of twins

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Michael is a director of Metropole Property Strategists who create wealth for their clients through independent, unbiased property advice and advocacy. He's been voted Australia's leading property investment adviser and his opinions are regularly featured in the media. Visit Metropole.com.au

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